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RADIOLOGY QUIZ
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 81-82  

Pulmonary mycetoma


Department of Medicine, Command Hospital, Kolkata, India

Date of Web Publication28-Jan-2012

Correspondence Address:
Sanjay Singhal
Chest Specialist, Command Hospital, Kolkata-700027
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-2113.92374

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How to cite this article:
Singhal S. Pulmonary mycetoma. Lung India 2012;29:81-2

How to cite this URL:
Singhal S. Pulmonary mycetoma. Lung India [serial online] 2012 [cited 2019 Sep 20];29:81-2. Available from: http://www.lungindia.com/text.asp?2012/29/1/81/92374

A computed tomography (CT) scan in supine position of 25-year-old male with the complaint of recurrent haemoptysis showed a solid round mass within a cavity partially surrounded by a radiolucent crescent (crescent sign) in apical segment of right lower lobe [Figure 1]. CT scan in the prone position shows that the mass moved within the cavity with the change in position [Figure 2]. The patient had history of pulmonary tuberculosis in the past for which he had taken adequate course of antitubercular treatment. At present she had no history of fever, anorexia, and weight loss. Sputum for acid fast bacilli was negative. Routine hematological and biochemical investigations were normal.
Figure 1: CT thorax showing round mass within a cavity partially surrounded by a radiolucent crescent (crescent sign) in apical segment of right lower lobe

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Figure 2: CT scan in the prone position shows that the mass moved within the cavity with the change in position

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Q1. What is your diagnosis?



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   References Top

1.Gupta PR, Vyas A, Meena RC, Sharma S, Khayam N, Subramanian IM, et al. Clinical profile of pulmonary aspergilloma complicating residual tubercular cavitations in Northen Indian patients. Lung India 2010;27:209-11.  Back to cited text no. 1
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2.Goldberg B. Radiologic appearances in pulmonary aspergillosis. Clin Radiol 1962;13:106.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Roberts CM, Citron KM, Stnckland BS. Intrathoracic aspergilloma: Role of CT diagnosis and treatment. Radiology 1987;165:123.   Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Breuer R, Baigelman W, Pugthegn RD. Occult mycetoma. J Comput Assist Tomogr 1982;6:166.  Back to cited text no. 4
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2]



 

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