Home | About us | Editorial Board | Search | Ahead of print | Current Issue | Archives | Instructions | Online submissionContact Us   |  Subscribe   |  Advertise   |  Login  Page layout
Wide layoutNarrow layoutFull screen layout
Lung India Official publication of Indian Chest Society  
  Users Online: 1726   Home Print this page  Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 137-142

Clinico-epidemiological profile of tobacco users attending a tobacco cessation clinic in a teaching hospital in Bangalore city


1 Tobacco Cessation Clinic; Department of Chest Medicine, St John's Medical College Hospital, Koramangala, Bangalore, India
2 Tobacco Cessation Clinic; Department of Psychiatry, St John's Medical College Hospital, Koramangala, Bangalore, India
3 Tobacco Cessation Clinic; Department of Psychiatry, St John's Medical College Hospital; St John's Research Institute, St John's National Academy of Health Sciences, Koramangala, Bangalore, India
4 Tobacco Cessation Clinic; Department of Community Medicine, St John's Medical College Hospital; St John's Research Institute, St John's National Academy of Health Sciences, Koramangala, Bangalore, India

Correspondence Address:
Prem K Mony
St John's Research Institute, 100 Feet Road, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: Presentation at a meeting: Presented, in part, at the 2nd National Conference on Tobacco or Health, Mumbai, India, 23-25 Sept 2010, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-2113.95314

Rights and Permissions

Background: Tobacco-attributable mortality in India is estimated to be at least 10%. Tobacco cessation is more likely to avert millions of deaths before 2050 than prevention of tobacco use initiation. Objective: To describe the clinico-epidemiological profile of attendees of a tobacco cessation clinic in a teaching hospital in Bangalore city. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study of 189 attendees seen over 2 years in the Tobacco Cessation Clinic of a tertiary-care teaching hospital in Bangalore, with information on socio demographic characteristics, tobacco-use details, nicotine dependence, family/medical history, past quit attempts, baseline stage-of-change, and treatment initiated. Results: Only 5% were 'walk-in' patients; 98% of attendees were smokers; 97% were males. The mean (±SD) age of attendees was 48.0 (±14.0) years. Most participants were married (88%), and predominantly urban (69%). About 62% had completed at least 8 years of schooling. Two-thirds of smokers reported high levels of nicotine dependence (Fagerström score >5/10). About 43% of patients had attempted quitting earlier. Four-fifths (79%) of tobacco-users reported a family member using tobacco. Commonly documented comorbidities included: Chronic respiratory disease (44%), hypertension (23%), diabetes (12%), tuberculosis (9%), myocardial infarction (2%), stroke (1%), sexual dysfunction (1%) and cancer (0.5%). About 52% reported concomitant alcohol use. At baseline, patients' motivational stage was: Precontemplation (14%), contemplation (48%), preparation/action (37%) and maintenance (1%). Treatment modalities started were: Counseling alone (41%), nicotine replacement therapy alone (NRT) (34%), medication alone (13%), and NRT+medication (12%). Conclusions: This is the first study of the baseline profile of patients attending a tobacco cessation clinic located within a chest medicine department in India. Important determinants of outcome have been captured for follow-up and prospective documentation of outcomes.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2203    
    Printed82    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded360    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 3    

Recommend this journal