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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 305-306  

Smokeless tobacco use in pediatric population: What is the role of a Dental Surgeon in India?


Department of Dentistry, Government Taluk Head Quarters Hospital, Nilambur - 679329, India

Date of Web Publication28-Jul-2012

Correspondence Address:
Thorakkal Shamim
Department of Dentistry, Government Taluk Head Quarters Hospital, Nilambur - 679329
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-2113.99137

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How to cite this article:
Shamim T. Smokeless tobacco use in pediatric population: What is the role of a Dental Surgeon in India?. Lung India 2012;29:305-6

How to cite this URL:
Shamim T. Smokeless tobacco use in pediatric population: What is the role of a Dental Surgeon in India?. Lung India [serial online] 2012 [cited 2020 Jan 17];29:305-6. Available from: http://www.lungindia.com/text.asp?2012/29/3/305/99137

Sir,

Adolescents are the most vulnerable population to initiate tobacco use. [1] Tobacco is being used as smoking tobacco and smokeless tobacco. Smoking tobacco is manufactured as cigarettes, bidis, cigars, pipes and sticks. Smokeless tobaccos are manufactured as panmasala and gutkha. The increased prevalence of the use of the smokeless form among young Indians spawned an epidemic of oral cancer among young populations as revealed by many studies. [2],[3] On the other hand, tobacco-associated lesions such as oral leukoplakia and oral submucous fibrosis are the potentially malignant disorders of the oral mucosa that are seen in the young adolescent population in India. [4]

Articles regarding smoking cessation and clinicoepidemiological profile of tobacco users attending a tobacco cessation clinic have already been published in the esteemed journal Lung India. [5],[6] Dental surgeons play an important role in the control of smokeless tobacco use. It should be one of the prime duties of the dental surgeons to get involved in tobacco awareness programmes. They should also influence the legislature to come out with tobacco control laws, especially the regulation of the sale of tobacco by a gradual increase in the tax on tobacco products. Dental surgeons should engage in setting up tobacco cessation clinics and they should educate the public regarding the hazards of the use of smokeless tobacco. Oral screening (screening for tobacco associated lesions) should be implemented by dental surgeons in conjunction with the local branches of Indian Dental Association in schools to improve the future of oral health care in India.

The majority of the working dentists in India have received no training in tobacco cessation strategies and there is a need to include smoking cessation training in the dental curriculum in India. The major barriers for delivering successful tobacco cessation campaigns may be the amount of time required, lack of reimbursement, lack of training, lack of patient education materials and lack of the knowledge of available referral resources. Dental surgeons should be given effective training for delivering effective tobacco dependence intervention programmes and the government should incorporate dental surgeons in school health programmes to carry out lectures, oral screening and dental camps to achieve tobacco free future adolescent community in India.

 
   References Top

1.Chadda R, Sengupta S. Tobacco use by Indian adolescents. Tob Induc Dis 2002; 1:111-9.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]    
2.Gupta PC, Sinha DN. Tobacco research in India. Indian J Public Health 2004; 48:103-4.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
3.Madan Kumar PD, Poorni S, Ramachandran S. Tobacco use among school children in Chennai city, India. Indian J Cancer 2006; 43:127-31.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
4.Warnakulasuriya S, Johnson NW, van der Waal I. Nomenclature and classification of potentially malignant disorders of the oral mucosa. J Oral Pathol Med 2007; 36:575-80.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.Kumar R, Prakash S, Khushwah AS, Kumar H. Smoking cessation-control measures. Lung India 2005; 22:68-73.  Back to cited text no. 5
  Medknow Journal  
6.DSouza G, Rekha DP, Sreedaran P, Srinivasan K, Mony PK. Clinico-epidemiological profile of tobacco users attending a tobacco cessation clinic in a teaching hospital in Bangalore city. Lung India 2012; 29:137- 42.  Back to cited text no. 6
    




 

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