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Lung India Official publication of Indian Chest Society  
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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 354-362

Digital clubbing


1 Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla, India
2 Department of Endocrinology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, Pondicherry, India
3 Department of Endocrinology, Post Graduate Student (Medicine), Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla, India

Correspondence Address:
Malay Sarkar
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Indira Gandhi Medical College, Shimla- 171 001
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-2113.102824

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Digital clubbing is an ancient and important clinical signs in medicine. Although clubbed fingers are mostly asymptomatic, it often predicts the presence of some dreaded underlying diseases. Its exact pathogenesis is not known, but platelet-derived growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor are recently incriminated in its causation. The association of digital clubbing with various disease processes and its clinical implications are discussed in this review.


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