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RADIOLOGY QUIZ
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 29  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 390-391  

An unusual cause of photographic negative of pulmonary edema: Sarcoidosis


1 Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab, India
2 Department of Medicine, Christian Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab, India
3 Department of Anesthesiology, Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury MD, USA

Date of Web Publication23-Oct-2012

Correspondence Address:
Akashdeep Singh
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana, Punjab
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-2113.102844

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How to cite this article:
Singh A, James R, Kaur R, Singh J. An unusual cause of photographic negative of pulmonary edema: Sarcoidosis. Lung India 2012;29:390-1

How to cite this URL:
Singh A, James R, Kaur R, Singh J. An unusual cause of photographic negative of pulmonary edema: Sarcoidosis. Lung India [serial online] 2012 [cited 2019 Oct 22];29:390-1. Available from: http://www.lungindia.com/text.asp?2012/29/4/390/102844

A 38-year-old male was admitted with complaints of fever, dry cough and progressive breathlessness of 6-week duration. His medical history was unremarkable.

On admission, he was febrile, with a temperature of 38.8΀C. His pulse was 108 beats/min, blood pressure was 148/94 mmHg and respiratory rate was 30 breaths/min, with a room air saturation of 90%. Respiratory examination revealed bilateral diffuse fine inspiratory crackles. The rest of the physical examination was unremarkable.

His routine investigations did not reveal any abnormality. The chest X-ray showed bilateral dense peripheral opacities with ill-defined margins without any segmental distribution [Figure 1]. High-resolution computed tomography of the chest revealed peripheral, subpleural confluent ground glass haze and consolidation in the middle and lower lobes [Figure 2].
Figure 1: Chest radiograph showing bilateral peripheral opacities

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Figure 2: High-resolution computed tomography of the chest showing bilateral peripheral air-space disease

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   Question Top


What is your differential diagnosis?



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   References Top

1.Gaensler EA, Carrington CB. Peripheral opacities in chronic eosinophilic pneumonia: The photographic negative of pulmonary edema. AJR Am J Roentgenol 1977;128:1-13.  Back to cited text no. 1
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2.Akbar JJ, Meyer CA, Shipley RT, Vagal AS. Cardiopulmonary imaging in sarcoidosis. Clin Chest Med 2008;29:429-43.  Back to cited text no. 2
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  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3]



 

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