Home | About us | Editorial Board | Search | Ahead of print | Current Issue | Archives | Instructions | Online submissionContact Us   |  Subscribe   |  Advertise   |  Login  Page layout
Wide layoutNarrow layoutFull screen layout
Lung India Official publication of Indian Chest Society  
  Users Online: 1097   Home Print this page  Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size


 
  Table of Contents    
CASE LETTER
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 32  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 292-293  

Case report: Non-small-cell lung carcinoma presenting as a foot swelling


1 Department of Medical Oncology, Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Rohini, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Pathology, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, Dilshad Garden, Delhi, India

Date of Web Publication5-May-2015

Correspondence Address:
Varun Goel
Department of Medical Oncology, Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Rohini, New Delhi
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-2113.156259

Rights and Permissions

How to cite this article:
John MC, Goel V, Tiwari S, Talwar V, Patnaik N. Case report: Non-small-cell lung carcinoma presenting as a foot swelling. Lung India 2015;32:292-3

How to cite this URL:
John MC, Goel V, Tiwari S, Talwar V, Patnaik N. Case report: Non-small-cell lung carcinoma presenting as a foot swelling. Lung India [serial online] 2015 [cited 2019 Sep 16];32:292-3. Available from: http://www.lungindia.com/text.asp?2015/32/3/292/156259

Sir,

Acrometastases are defined as malignant secondary lesions of the bones located in the hands and/or feet. Acrometastases are very rare and are generally late manifestations of occult cancer and associated with a poor prognosis. In literature, only few cases of acrometastases due to occult lung cancer have been reported. [1] We report a case of acrometastasis to the left foot from an occult lung cancer.

A 55-year-old female patient presented with complains of pain and swelling in the left foot of two-month duration. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the left foot showed erosion of the cortex of the second metatarsal with marrow edema and associated soft tissue abnormality noted just anterior to the eroded cortex [Figure 1]. Biopsy from the second metatarsal bone was suggestive of metastatic deposit and tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin 7 (CK-7), Epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), Thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), and NAPSIN, suggestive of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Adenocarcinoma (NSCLC) [Figure 2].
Figure 1: MRI of left foot showed erosion of the cortex of the second metatarsal with marrow edema and associated soft tissue abnormality noted just anterior to the eroded cortex

Click here to view
Figure 2: (a) H & E section showing tumor cells arranged in nests and glandular pattern. Tumor cells were positive for, (b) CK-7, (c) TTF-1, and (d) NAPSIN

Click here to view


On careful history taking, she was a 15-pack-a-year smoker. The whole body positron emission tomography (PET) computed tomography (CT) showed a left lung lower lobe, hypermetabolic, soft tissue mass and subcarinal and left hilar lymphnodes [Figure 3]a. A hypermetabolic soft-tissue mass in the left base of the second metatarsal, with enlarged lymphnodes, was seen in the proximal left external iliac, left obturator, left inguinofemoral, and popliteal regions [Figure 3]b. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation was not detected in the biopsy specimen.
Figure 3: (a) PET CT showed a hypermetabolic soft tissue mass seen in the left foot with destruction of the underlying base of the second metatarsal, (b) Left lung lower lobe showed a peripheral lobulated hypermetabolic soft tissue mass

Click here to view


The patient was started on external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) to the left foot, followed by systemic chemotherapy with Pemetrexed- and Cisplatin-based palliative chemotherapy. Post two courses of chemotherapy she had a dramatic response to the treatment with a decrease in pain in the left foot.

Bone metastasis is a common occurrence in patients with advanced carcinomas, particularly in those with lung, breast, and prostate cancer. However, metastases distal to the knee are very rare and metastases to the bones of the foot are even rarer. Metastases to bone develop in 30% of all patients with cancer, with only 0.007 to 0.3% having acrometastasis. [1] The most common sources of acrometastasis are colorectal, renal, and lung carcinomas (50%), with the bladder, uterus, and breast responsible for 25% of the metastases to the foot. [2] Acrometastases are rarely the initial presentation of metastatic carcinoma. In a series by Healey et al., they were seen as the initial manifestation of an occult malignancy in four (14%) of the 29 patients. [3]

Acrometastasis are often initially mistaken for more benign processes, such as infection, trauma, inflammatory arthritis, osteomyelitis or gout. Persistent symptoms, unresponsiveness to conservative therapy or prior history of malignancy should prompt the physician to consider metastases, when evaluating a patient.

Given the bleak prognosis of digital acrometastatic lung cancer, treatment is largely palliative. Amputation and chemotherapy have been used, but recent literature suggests that localized radiotherapy can successfully relieve the pain and return the function to the affected foot. [4] There may also be a targeted role for bone-remodeling and pharmacotherapies, such as, bisphosfonates or denosumab, which have demonstrated utility in treating other bony metastases. [5] Treatment is directed toward the relief of symptoms and restoration of functional capacity.

 
   References Top

1.
Zindrick MR, Young MP, Daley RJ, Light TR. Metastatic tumors of the foot: Case report and literature review. Clin Orthop Relat Res 1982:219-25.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Baran R, Tosti A. Metastatic carcinoma to the terminal phalanx of the big toe: Report of two cases and review of the literature. J Am Acad Dermatol 1994;31:259-63.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Healey JH, Turnbull AD, Miedema B, Lane JM. Acrometastases. A study of twenty-nine patients with osseous involvement of the hands and feet. J Bone Joint Surg Am 1986;68:743-6.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]    
4.
Flynn CJ, Danjoux C, Wong J, Christakis M, Rubenstein J, Yee A, et al. Two cases of acrometastasis to the hands and review of the literature. Curr Oncol 2008;15:51-8.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Smith MR, Egerdie B, Hernández Toriz N, Feldman R, Tammela TL, Saad F, et al. Denosumab in men receiving androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. N Engl J Med 2009;361:745-55.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3]



 

Top
  
 
  Search
 
  
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
    References
    Article Figures

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1070    
    Printed11    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded256    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal