Lung India

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 37  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 8--12

Clinical profile and course of children with postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans from a tertiary care hospital


Krishna Mohan Gulla, Kana Ram Jat, Rakesh Lodha, Sushil K Kabra 
 Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Kana Ram Jat
Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi - 110 029
India

Background: Postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans (PIBO) is a chronic obstructive lung disease with scanty information in literature on etiology, clinical profile, treatment, and outcome. Objective: The objective of the study is to describe the clinical profile and course of children diagnosed with PIBO. Methods: A chart review of children below 18 years of age diagnosed as PIBO over the past 9 years was carried out. Details of clinical profile, laboratory investigations, imaging, treatment received, and outcome were recorded. Results: Eight children (boys 4) with PIBO were identified. Median (interquartile range [IQR]) age at the first episode of acute severe bronchiolitis such as illness and diagnosis of PIBO was 15 (6, 23.5) and 30 (16.5, 60) months, respectively, indicating a delay in diagnosis. The most common symptoms were recurrent episodes of cough (100%), fast breathing (100%), wheezing (87.5%), and fever (62.5%). Median (IQR) number of hospitalizations and episodes of antibiotic use prior to diagnosis were 2.5 (2, 5.5) and 2 (2, 4), respectively. Three (37.5%) children received mechanical ventilation during previous hospitalizations. Chest computed tomography revealed mosaic attenuation in 8 (100%), ground-glass opacities in 2 (25%), and bronchial wall thickening in 2 (25%). After diagnosis, 7 received oral steroids, 7 received hydroxychloroquine, 5 received azithromycin, and 2 received azathioprine. The median (IQR) duration of follow-up (n = 6) was 6 (1.5, 9.5) months. Median (IQR) number of pulmonary exacerbations in follow-up was 2 (1, 5). Conclusion: PIBO is still an under-recognized entity with substantial delay in diagnosis and unnecessary use of antibiotics. Clinical course with imaging findings may help to diagnose and manage this entity.


How to cite this article:
Gulla KM, Jat KR, Lodha R, Kabra SK. Clinical profile and course of children with postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans from a tertiary care hospital.Lung India 2020;37:8-12


How to cite this URL:
Gulla KM, Jat KR, Lodha R, Kabra SK. Clinical profile and course of children with postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans from a tertiary care hospital. Lung India [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Mar 28 ];37:8-12
Available from: http://www.lungindia.com/article.asp?issn=0970-2113;year=2020;volume=37;issue=1;spage=8;epage=12;aulast=Gulla;type=0